​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The six new segments

Our health and environment research study has revealed an important new segmentation of consumers. Each of these six segments has its own beliefs, values and information sources, and its own ambitions and drivers for change, creating clear opportunities for both targeted products and messaging.​

Joggers on beach

​​01 | Active Ambassadors​

Accounting for 8% of the total global research group, Active Ambassadors have high engagement in all aspects of health and environment. They are very willing to take action, challenge boundaries and influence others: 80% actively try to influence their friends with their views. They also score top for believing that environment issues impact on their health, and that the purchase choices they make for their personal health have an impact on the environment.​

Specific motivations: Animal welfare; future generations.
Trusted sources: NGOs, scientists.
How to approach them: Use them as influencers and as part of expert groups. Bring them more expertise, news and facts.​

Boy cleaning beach in Guatemala

​​​02 | Planet Friends

Accounting for 14% of the total, Planet Friends are engaged and willing to take action about the environment. They also have high engagement on most aspects of health, but are less inclined to challenge barriers and try new boundaries in this area – health for them is about peace of mind. They are less inclined to influence others than Active Ambassadors. Planet Friends say they are prepared to pay more for environmentally sound packaging, and would also sacrifice convenience for environmentally sound products.​

Specific motivations: Less negative impact on the environment; future generations.
Trusted sources: NGOs, scientists.
How to approach them: They want to hear and understand the facts. Channel viewpoints and research from scientists.

Woman shopping fruit at market in asia

​​03 | Health Conscious

Accounting for 10% of the total, the Health Conscious are aware and engaged about environment, but even more so about health. They are prepared to try new things, and to pay more and sacrifice convenience for healthy products. Particularly influenced by social media and forums, they are fashionable – they say they are using the latest trends and findings to improve their health – but are not trend-setters. Organic and natural rate highly with them. This segment is particularly strong in China.​

Specific motivations: Less negative impact on the environment; seen/read something that changed my views and values.
Trusted sources: Social media, forums.
How to approach them: Inspire them to find new ways to improve their health. Stimulate interaction with their peers via social media.​

Youths in Asia taking selfie

​​04 | Followers

Accounting for 31% of the total, Followers are a sizeable mainstream cohort with interesting potential. They engage enough with health and environmental issues to feel guilty about both: they feel they need to do more, but are not inclined to change behaviour or try new things. They need more information and to be persuaded and energised to act. This segment is particularly strong in South Korea.​

Specific motivations: Better physical health; I want to feel better about myself.
Trusted sources: Social media, forums.
How to approach them: Give them the nudge and support they need. Make change as easy as possible. Provide encouragement and helpful instruction.​

Woman eating waffles

​​05 | Sceptics

Accounting for 18% of the total, Sceptics have relatively low engagement on both health and environmental issues. They are cautious about technology and social media, and are not inclined to challenge boundaries or try new things. They tend to only make changes when it fits their lifestyle. More than average say they don’t care about the environment or don’t believe their lifestyle affects the environment – yet many say a healthy lifestyle is important. This segment is particularly strong in the USA.​

Specific motivations: Social pressure from family and friends; regulations.
Trusted sources: Retailers, politicians, family/friends.
How to approach them: Reach out on a local, grassroots level. They need to be convinced by those they recognise and trust: “people like us”.

Young man in cafe

​​​​​06 | Laggards​​

Accounting for 18% of the total, Laggards have a lack of knowledge of/interest in all aspects of health and environment. They claim they are willing to take action and challenge boundaries, but score low on planned changes for the future and high on “live for today”. They are sceptical about new technology (which they believe may be a risk to personal health) and change, and they actively try to influence others. Above average say they don’t care about the environment – more than half say they are “tired about the fuss” – and also that a healthy lifestyle is not important.​

Specific motivations: Social pressure from family and friends; regulations.
Trusted sources: Retailers, brands, politicians, family/friends.
How to approach them: Give them more exposure to the issues and knowledge in general.​​